Icy, snow covered roads lead to accidents across the state

Slide-offs were reported across the Wichita area Thursday. (KSN Photo)

WICHITA, Kan. (KSNW) – A fast-moving winter storm dumped snow and caused icy roads across Kansas.

The National Weather Service issued a winter storm warning until noon for parts of central Kansas, with a winter weather advisory for east central, north central and northeast Kansas. Between 2 and 5 inches of snow was expected to fall near Topeka, with the heaviest amounts west of Hiawatha to Council Grove. The snow will be accompanied by strong winds and freezing temperatures.

Most schools were closed and other activities also were cancelled. Numerous accidents and slide-offs were reported as temperatures dropped quickly and rain turned to ice.

In Salina, the Kansas Highway Patrol reports a semi slid off the road. The patrol reports that they have worked numerous accidents since this morning. No injuries have been reported.

Further south in Wichita, KSN found many vehicles sliding off the roadways due to icy conditions. Many reported that the morning commute was slow going. EARP is in effect for Wichita. For the latest road conditions across Kansas click here. In Wichita, you can track the road conditions on Wichway.org

Triple AAA recommends the following for driving in winter weather:

  • Accelerate and decelerate slowly. Applying the gas slowly to accelerate is the best method for regaining traction and avoiding skids. Don’t try to get moving in a hurry. And take time to slow down for a stoplight. Remember: It takes longer to slow down on icy roads.
  • Drive slowly. Everything takes longer on snow-covered roads. Accelerating, stopping, turning – nothing happens as quickly as on dry pavement. Give yourself time to maneuver by driving slowly.
  • The normal dry pavement following distance of three to four seconds should be increased to eight to ten seconds. This increased margin of safety will provide the longer distance needed if you have to stop.
  • Know your brakes. Whether you have antilock brakes or not, the best way to stop is threshold breaking. Keep the heel of your foot on the floor and use the ball of your foot to apply firm, steady pressure on the brake pedal.
  • Don’t stop if you can avoid it. There’s a big difference in the amount of inertia it takes to start moving from a full stop versus how much it takes to get moving while still rolling. If you can slow down enough to keep rolling until a traffic light changes, do it.
  • Don’t power up hills. Applying extra gas on snow-covered roads just starts your wheels spinning. Try to get a little inertia going before you reach the hill and let that inertia carry you to the top. As you reach the crest of the hill, reduce your speed and proceed down hill as slowly as possible.
  • Don’t stop going up a hill. There’s nothing worse than trying to get moving up a hill on an icy road. Get some inertia going on a flat roadway before you take on the hill.
  • Stay home. If you really don’t have to go out, don’t. Even if you can drive well in the snow, not everyone else can. Don’t tempt fate: If you don’t have somewhere you have to be, watch the snow from indoors.

Remember follow the KSN Storm Tracker Weather Team for the latest winter weather updates.


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