Woman credits 5-year-old granddaughter’s quick thinking for saving her life

Photo courtesy KSL-TV

AMERICAN FORK, Utah – A woman is praising her granddaughter’s quick actions, saying they likely saved her life.

Wendy Prescott said her 5-year-old granddaughter, Ruthie, knew exactly what to do when she collapsed Sunday morning.

Prescott, a diabetic, said she was having health issues in the weeks leading up to the incident.

“I get these random fevers and lately, just the last few weeks, I’ve been having these spells,” she said. “We don’t know for sure what it is. I just kind of collapsed.”

At around 10:50 a.m. Sunday, Ruthie got in contact with emergency dispatchers and explained the frightening situation.

Dispatcher: 911. What is the address of your emergency?

Ruthie: My grandma.

Dispatcher: OK, do you know what your address is?

Dispatcher: I have some people coming over. What’s happening?

Ruthie: My grandma got knocked out, and I don’t know how. And her sugar is right where it needs to be but she … she’s acting like she is sick.

Dispatcher: She’s acting like she’s sick? Is there anyone else home with you?
Ruthie: No.
Dispatcher: OK, just don’t hang up, OK? We have help coming. Is she right there with you? Are you right next to her?
Ruthie: Yeah.
Dispatcher: OK, is she breathing?
Ruthie: Yeah.
Prescott had taught Ruthie to dial 911 if that ever happened, to unlock the front door, and to put her service dog in its crate so that paramedics could do what they needed to do when they arrived.

Prescott was impressed to learn her granddaughter did all three things that day.

“She called 911 and knew exactly what to say,” Prescott said. “She rattled off our address and stayed on the phone until paramedics arrived. She wasn’t all freaked out like you would think. She was just like, ‘Come on in, this is where everything’s at’ to the paramedics.”

Prescott was taken to the hospital but doctors still don’t know what caused her to collapse. She hopes others can learn from her experience and teach their children what to do in an emergency.

“Don’t underestimate these kids,” she said. “They are so smart, and, if you tell them what to do if an emergency comes up, they can do it.”