Museum honoring daredevil Evel Knievel opens in Kansas

** FILE**Daredevil motorcyclist Evel Knievel poses at the open-air Canadian national exhibition stadium in Toronto, Canada, in an Aug. 20, 1974 file photo. Knievel never denied his scrapes with the law _ the late motorcycle daredevil often reveled in them. But even he objected to a 1970s FBI investigation of whether he was involved in a string of beatings. According to documents obtained by The Associated Press, the federal government came close to charging Knievel, who in turn threatened to sue the FBI for alleging he was connected to a crime syndicate. Neither followed through. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara, File)

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) – A new Kansas museum is giving enthusiasts of late motorcycle daredevil Evel Knievel a jump on appreciating his death-defying, bone-breaking exploits.

The $5-million, 13,000-square-foot homage to the man famous for rocket-powered and motorbike stunts before his 2007 death has opened in Topeka.

As president of the two-story museum attached to his Harley-Davidson dealership, Mike Patterson says Knievel memorabilia includes his motorcycles, leathers and helmets. There also are a virtual reality motorcycle jump, an interactive showing Knievel’s actual X-rays, and an exhibit in which visitors choose their own variables in planning a virtual jump.

Knievel’s Kansas ties include that he traced his career choice to the time he saw George “Joie” Chitwood’s Auto Daredevil Show at age 8. Chitwood, who died in 1988, got his racing start in Kansas.