KS elector to message 95,000 people who asked him to not vote Trump

TOPEKA, Kan. (KSNW) – A Kansas presidential elector plans to reply to the more than 95,000 people who emailed or wrote him urging him to not vote for Donald Trump on Dec. 19.

On Monday, all six Kansas presidential electors voted for Donald Trump, giving Trump the 270 Electoral College votes he needed to win the presidency.

Protesters gathered from coast-to-coast in a last-ditch effort to keep Trump out of the White House. The scene was no different at the Kansas state capitol where a group of people booed as the electors cast their vote for Trump.

“When that was read back to the audience we had a mixed reaction from the gallery. We had hissing, boo’s and also many claps,” said Chairman of the Kansas Republican Party and Kansas Elector Kelly Arnold.

Arnold said Monday’s vote was a sweet victory for Republicans.

“The Liberals have not been able to accept defeat and this is the end game for them as far as the presidential election,” Arnold said.

If Monday’s results were not enough for the people against Trump, Arnold said he has something up his sleeve, specifically for those who reached out to him and asked him to be a faithless elector.

“I am going to look at responding back to them all,” he said.

Arnold said he plans to send a blast email to the more than 95,000 people who reached out to him after the Nov. 8 election.

“I will look at doing that with a response that I did vote for Donald Trump, maybe have a photo of myself and my ballot,” he said.

As for what else will be in the mass email, Arnold would not go into detail. He did however smile when KSN asked him if he thought it would stir the election pot.

“They contacted me and I feel they deserve to have a response back,” he said. “I think they need to hear form the majority of America that we want a new president, that we want to go in a new direction and that’s what I’m letting them know. We listen to the voters here in Kansas and that’s who I represent.”

Congress will officially count the Electoral College votes on Jan. 6.