Steady crowd marks Election Day at Susan B. Anthony’s grave

Eitan Freedenberg and his fiancée, Molly Tarbell, both of Rochester take Tarbell's cousin, Josie Connell and her husband Shawn to see Susan B. Anthony's grave in Mt. Hope Cemetery in Rochester, NY on Monday, Nov. 7, 2016. The Connells were visiting from Brooklyn, NY. The cemetery will extend its hours on Election Day to give people more time to visit her grave. Rochester Mayor Lovely Warren says with Democrat Hillary Clinton as the first woman nominated by a major political party to run for president it's appropriate to keep Mount Hope Cemetery open later Tuesday night. (Tina Macintyre-Yee/Democrat & Chronicle via AP)
Eitan Freedenberg and his fiancée, Molly Tarbell, both of Rochester take Tarbell's cousin, Josie Connell and her husband Shawn to see Susan B. Anthony's grave in Mt. Hope Cemetery in Rochester, NY on Monday, Nov. 7, 2016. The Connells were visiting from Brooklyn, NY. The cemetery will extend its hours on Election Day to give people more time to visit her grave. Rochester Mayor Lovely Warren says with Democrat Hillary Clinton as the first woman nominated by a major political party to run for president it's appropriate to keep Mount Hope Cemetery open later Tuesday night. (Tina Macintyre-Yee/Democrat & Chronicle via AP)

ROCHESTER, N.Y. (AP) — Some voters are going from the polls to the cemetery in upstate New York to pay respects to women’s suffrage leader Susan B. Anthony.

Video from WHAM-TV shows a steady stream of people at Rochester’s Mount Hope cemetery decorating Anthony’s grave with “I Voted” stickers and American flags. Some are leaving yellow roses, which was a symbol of the women’s suffrage movement.

Among the visitors was Nora Rubel, the director of the Susan B. Anthony Institute at the University of Rochester. She tells the Rochester Democrat and Chronicle that she went to the polls and the grave with her two daughters in order to share the experience.

The cemetery extended its visiting hours to 9 p.m. Tuesday to allow for more visitors on the first presidential election to feature a woman as a major-party nominee.