Police release names of 5 victims in Massachusetts crash

The remains of a car that carried four college students and was involved in a fiery crash as a result of being struck head-on while driving on the northbound side of Interstate 495 sit at Marc's Towing company, Monday, Oct. 24, 2016, in Wareham, Mass. Five people, including the four college students, died early Monday in a fiery crash caused by a woman driving the wrong way on a Massachusetts highway, state police said. (Faith Ninivaggi/The Boston Herald via AP)
The remains of a car that carried four college students and was involved in a fiery crash as a result of being struck head-on while driving on the northbound side of Interstate 495 sit at Marc's Towing company, Monday, Oct. 24, 2016, in Wareham, Mass. Five people, including the four college students, died early Monday in a fiery crash caused by a woman driving the wrong way on a Massachusetts highway, state police said. (Faith Ninivaggi/The Boston Herald via AP)

MIDDLEBOROUGH, Mass. (AP) — Four of the five victims who died in a fiery wrong-way crash this week were young men who attended two Massachusetts colleges.

The men identified by state police on Tuesday were in a car heading north on Interstate 495 in Middleborough early Monday morning when they were struck head-on by a car going south in the northbound lanes. The driver of the wrong-way car, a Fall River woman, also died.

It appears the 20-year-old man driving the car, Kraig Diggs, didn’t have enough time to avoid the oncoming car, said Massachusetts State Police Maj. Anthony Thomas.

Diggs and one of his passengers, Jordan Galvin-Jutras, 19, were from Barnstable and attended Anna Maria College in Paxton. The other passengers were Jordan Fisher, 19, of Harwich, and Cory Licata, 18, of West Babylon, New York, who both attended Becker College in Worcester.

Family members said Diggs, Galvin-Jutras and Fisher were related.

The driver of the wrong-way car was identified as Valantein Burson, 31.

“The mood here is very, very somber,” said Andrew Klein, the vice president for student affairs at Anna Maria, a Catholic college with about 850 full-time undergraduate students.

Diggs was a sophomore business major while Galvin-Jutras was a sophomore fire sciences major, he said.

The school held a prayer vigil Monday and has made grief counselors available. A memorial service will be held at a future date.

“We are deeply saddened by the tragic loss of two of our students,” Becker, a school with about 2,000 students, posted on its website, adding that it was also providing counseling services.

The crash remains under investigation. Police are trying to determine why and where Burson got on the wrong side of the highway and whether drugs or alcohol were involved.