Dakota Access pipeline case set to be heard by DC court

In this Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2016, photo, volunteers toss logs at an oil pipeline protest encampment near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in southern North Dakota. The logs will be used to cook meals for the thousands of people who have come to the area to fight the $3.8 billion Dakota Access pipeline. (AP Photo/James MacPherson).
In this Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2016, photo, volunteers toss logs at an oil pipeline protest encampment near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in southern North Dakota. The logs will be used to cook meals for the thousands of people who have come to the area to fight the $3.8 billion Dakota Access pipeline. (AP Photo/James MacPherson).

WASHINGTON (AP) — A three-judge federal appeals court panel is set to hear a dispute over the $3.8 billion four-state Dakota Access oil pipeline.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit is being asked to keep a temporary stop of construction in place while the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe appeals a lower-court ruling from September that didn’t block the pipeline.

The same appeals court earlier issued a temporary injunction against construction for 20 miles on either side of the Missouri River at Lake Oahe to give it time to consider the tribe’s request. The pipeline is otherwise nearly complete.

The tribes say the construction and operation of the pipeline, which is being built by Dallas-based Energy Transfer Partners, would damage and destroy sites of historic, religious and cultural significance.