Trump as nominee improves odds for parts of Obama’s legacy

Donald Trump's rise to the presumptive Republican nominee makes some of Obama's main achievements more likely to survive after the next president takes over.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a primary night news conference, Tuesday, May 3, 2016, in New York. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

WASHINGTON (AP) — There’s no cheering at the White House for Donald Trump’s success. Yet for President Barack Obama, things could be worse.

Trump’s ascent as the presumptive Republican nominee makes some of Obama’s main achievements more likely to survive after the next president takes over. Trump’s policy prescriptions, while full of contradictions and short on specifics, are generally closer to Obama’s than those of Trump’s closest GOP rival, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz.

Where Cruz opposed Obama’s outreach to Cuba, Trump said it’s “fine,” though he would have handled it differently. Trump even has embraced a few essential elements of Obama’s health law, long the bane of the Republican Party. On gay and transgender rights, the New York businessman has taken a softer tone than Cruz and most of the other Republicans who sought the nomination, too.

To be sure, a Trump presidency would be bad news for most of Obama’s legacy. After all, Trump has said Obama may go down as the worst president in history.

Trump has said that if he’s elected, he’ll terminate Obama’s immigration actions and build a wall on the border with Mexico. He rails against Obama’s trade deals and laughs off concerns about climate change, while saying he would repeal the Dodd-Frank financial reforms.

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