Investigation: Secret Service tried to discredit US lawmaker

FILE - In this March 19, 2015, file photo, Secret Service Director Joseph Clancy testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, before the Senate subcommittee on Regulatory Affairs and Federal Management hearing to review the fiscal 2016 funding request and budget justification for the Secret Service. A new government report concludes that scores of Secret Service employees improperly accessed the decade-old job application of Rep. Jason Chaffetz, chairman of the House Oversight Committee, who was investigating scandals inside the agency. A deputy director was caught suggesting officials leak embarrassing information to retaliate against Chaffetz. The report said the actions could represent criminal violations under the U.S. Privacy Act. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) — A new government report concludes that scores of Secret Service employees improperly accessed the decade-old job application of the congressman who was investigating scandals inside the agency.

An assistant director was caught suggesting officials leak embarrassing information to retaliate against Rep. Jason Chaffetz, the Utah Republican who is chairman of the House oversight committee.

The report said the actions could represent criminal violations under the U.S. Privacy Act.

Employees accessed Chaffetz’s 2003 application for a Secret Service job moments after the start of a March congressional hearing about the latest scandal involving drunken behavior by agents. Some forwarded the information to others. At least 45 employees viewed the file.

An assistant director suggested leaking the information about Chaffetz two days before The Daily Beast, an Internet publication, wrote about it.

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