Family hopes medical marijuana can help their son control his seizures

Kiley and Gavin Klug, advocates for medical marijuana, glance at their seven-year-old son Owen after after giving testimony to the Senate's Public Health and Welfare Committee on Wednesday Jan. 21, 2015, at the Kansas Statehouse in Topeka. Two Democratic lawmakers have filed bills that would allow some patients with chronic illnesses to legally obtain and use marijuana. Similar measures have been filed since 2009, but none has progressed past informational hearings where no action can be taken, such as the ones this week. (AP Photo/The Topeka Capital Journal, Chris Neal)
Kiley and Gavin Klug, advocates for medical marijuana, glance at their seven-year-old son Owen after after giving testimony to the Senate's Public Health and Welfare Committee on Wednesday Jan. 21, 2015, at the Kansas Statehouse in Topeka. Two Democratic lawmakers have filed bills that would allow some patients with chronic illnesses to legally obtain and use marijuana. Similar measures have been filed since 2009, but none has progressed past informational hearings where no action can be taken, such as the ones this week. (AP Photo/The Topeka Capital Journal, Chris Neal)

ODIN, Kansas – On Wednesday, Kiley Klug and her husband testified in front of the state about medical marijuana, hoping to help their son Owen, who has had ten to forty seizures every day.

“This is our last ditch effort, because we don’t have anything else to try,” said Kiley Klug.

Her son, Owen, is seven years old. He’s had seizures for most of his life.

“At one point he was on four anti-convulsents, and he was vomiting for three months straight and it sent him to the hospital.”

Owen suffers from Dravet Syndrome, a severe form of epilepsy and medication can’t control his seizures.

“We have tried holistic treatments, we have tried oil therapy, we have tried everything we can and we’re now to the point where there’s nothing else to try.”

That’s why they testified for medical marijuana in a hearing at the statehouse Wednesday, hoping that marijuana oil can control his seizures. Owen’s syndrome hinders his development. He used to be able to walk on his own and now sometimes can’t even sit up.

“His development is a roller coaster, he loses skills, he gains skills slowly back, he loses them again, If we could control these seizures in him he could start thriving, he could start saying words, he could start crawling,” said Klug.

Some of Owen’s medications can be harmful, causing kidney, liver and heart damage. All they want is to have their son healthy and his seizures under control.

“He unfortunately looks like a little boy trapped in his own body, and you can see when you look into his eyes that he’s in there, just waiting to get out and I’m really excited to meet my son again.”

The Klug family says that they are going to try some of the seizure medications with Owen again that he hasn’t been on in years, hoping that this time one of them can help control his seizures.

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