For Michael Phelps, there’s no place like home

In this July 31, 2014 photo, Michael Phelps washes off his feet after swimming at Meadowbrook Aquatic and Fitness Center in Baltimore. This is where Phelps put in most of the work to become the most decorated athlete in Olympic history. This is where he's looking to add to that legacy after an aborted retirement, his eyes firmly on the Rio Games two years away. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
In this July 31, 2014 photo, Michael Phelps washes off his feet after swimming at Meadowbrook Aquatic and Fitness Center in Baltimore. This is where Phelps put in most of the work to become the most decorated athlete in Olympic history. This is where he's looking to add to that legacy after an aborted retirement, his eyes firmly on the Rio Games two years away. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

BALTIMORE (AP) — Sitting on the deck at his beloved Meadowbrook, Michael Phelps glances toward the pool where he was once afraid to put his face in the water.

“This is me,” he said, a slight smile curling off his lips. “This is home.”

This is where Phelps put in most of the work to become the most decorated athlete in Olympic history. This is where he’s looking to add to that legacy after an aborted retirement, his eyes firmly on the Rio Games two years away.

And as the world’s greatest swimmer takes his comeback to its biggest stop yet — this week’s U.S. national championships in Irvine, California — it’s important for him to remember where he came from.

Why? Because for all the hoopla over LeBron James returning to Cleveland, there’s no bigger homebody than Phelps.

He still trains at the pool where he learned to swim, a nondescript building in Baltimore’s inner suburbs, right in the middle of the Jones Falls flood plain.

Drive past the shuttered ice rink with weeds growing up at the edges and there it is, a rectangular cube of gray concrete blocks.

Inside, kids do cannonballs off the side of the pool, teenagers sun on the faux beach with umbrellas stuck in the sand, geriatrics glide slowly through the water looking to ward off the advancing years.

In the middle of this scene out of Anywhere USA, there’s Phelps and his star-studded training group, an impressive collection of gold medalists, world champions and national record holders.

“It’s funny,” said his longtime coach, Bob Bowman. “When I come out here and see kids playing around, that’s just what Michael did every day when he was a little kid. When I first met him, he was just playing around in the pool, playing games with his friends.”

As they wrapped up preparations for the national championships, Phelps and Bowman shared an exclusive look at what goes on behind the scenes with The Associated Press.

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