Creek fills up in one night after being dry for years


ELLIS, Kansas – The drought in the city of Ellis has been so bad that their creek has been dry for three years and all outdoor watering was banned.

Last summer, the city even redistributed pool water, but with over 4 inches of rain coming with the storm last night, residents have something to celebrate.

“We just wanted to see how it looked, and we’ve been out to all the bridges. We’re just really excited to see water all back in here,” said Max Zahn, Ellis Resident.

The Ellis dam turned into a tourist site Thursday morning. Heavy rain overnight filled the creek.  The creek was completely dry Wednesday night. (KSN Photo)
The Ellis dam turned into a tourist site Thursday morning. Heavy rain overnight filled the creek. The creek was completely dry Wednesday night. (KSN Photo)

The Ellis dam and Big Creek turned into a tourist site Thursday morning.

“This morning, I came over here at ten till seven as soon as it got light out, and there were still already five or six cars that were coming by and beat me down here to see how much water was in here,” said Lyle Johnston, Ellis Mayor.

Residents have not seen the creek this high in years.

“It actually gives you an awe moment because we’ve been fighting a drought for so long here,” said Alan Scheuerman, Ellis Public Works Director. “It’s been a great concern to all of our citizens and our city council, and they have taken effective choices to try to get that increasing our water supply.”

Officials with the city say that they hope this lasts them through the fall providing temporary relief from the drought.

“If the drought continues, we definitely need more rainfall or to search for another water source,” added Scheuerman.

But the mayor cautions residents to remember the drought isn’t over.

He says that water restrictions are still in place.

“It’s a matter of foresight and thinking of the future, even if, right now, it is a lot nicer than yesterday,” added Johnston.

The city will decide whether to make changes in their water conservation and drought plan at their next meeting.

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