Asiana: Plane systems partly to blame in crash

FILE - In this July 6, 2013 aerial file photo, the wreckage of Asiana Flight 214 lies on the ground after it crashed at the San Francisco International Airport, in San Francisco. The Boeing 777 has one of the best safety records in aviation history. It first carried passengers in June 1995 and went 18 years without a fatal accident. That streak came to an end with the July 2013 Asiana crash. Three of the 307 people aboard that flight died. “It's one of the most reliable airplanes ever built,” said John Goglia, a former member of the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, file)
FILE - In this July 6, 2013 aerial file photo, the wreckage of Asiana Flight 214 lies on the ground after it crashed at the San Francisco International Airport, in San Francisco. The Boeing 777 has one of the best safety records in aviation history. It first carried passengers in June 1995 and went 18 years without a fatal accident. That streak came to an end with the July 2013 Asiana crash. Three of the 307 people aboard that flight died. “It's one of the most reliable airplanes ever built,” said John Goglia, a former member of the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, file)

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Asiana Airlines says a Boeing 777 that crashed at San Francisco International Airport had inadequate warning systems to alert the crew to problems with air speed.

In a filing with the National Transportation Safety Board released on Monday, the airline says there was no indication that the plane’s autothrottle had stopped maintaining the set air speed.

Additionally, it says a low air speed alerting system came on too late for the pilots to avoid the crash.

Asiana also acknowledged that its crew failed to monitor and maintain a safe airspeed but said inconsistencies in the aircraft’s automation logic and deficient warning systems contributed to the failure.

The NTSB previously said the crew showed signs of confusion about the elaborate computer systems of the Boeing 777 that crashed on July 6 and resulted in three deaths.

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