New Albuquerque police shooting probe sought

This March 16, 2014 photo of an Albuquerque Police Department lapel camera still, shows a standoff with an illegal camper in the Albuquerque foothills, before firing six shots at the man. (AP Photo/Albuquerque Police Department)
This March 16, 2014 photo of an Albuquerque Police Department lapel camera still, shows a standoff with an illegal camper in the Albuquerque foothills, before firing six shots at the man. (AP Photo/Albuquerque Police Department)

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Albuquerque police oversight panel members on Tuesday demanded an independent investigation into the fatal police shooting of a homeless man as video footage from the altercation brought further condemnation from across the state.

Speaking a day after Albuquerque Mayor Richard Berry called video of the shooting “horrific,” Police Oversight Task Force members said a new investigation was needed to examine the death of James Boyd. Members said they wanted an independent review of Albuquerque police and the Second Judicial District Attorney’s Office.

Authorities said Boyd, 38, died after officers fired stun guns, bean bags and six live rounds on March 16. Police said Boyd had threatened to kill officers and held onto knives as an unarmed K-9 officer approached him.

A helmet camera video showed Boyd gathering his belongings then turning away right before officers fired following a long standoff where Boyd claimed he was a federal government agent.

The shooting came as the Albuquerque Police Department is the subject of a U.S. Justice Department investigation involving the use of force and three dozen officer shootings — 22 fatal — since 2010.

But most of the shootings weren’t caught on video because the department didn’t start requiring officers to wear lapel cameras until May 2012.

Videos of other police shootings have generated small protests, but the latest video footage has drawn fire from local and state elected officials and various civil rights groups.

A protest Tuesday evening in downtown Albuquerque drew a crowd from around the city and Santa Fe. Some chanted “We want justice,” while others held signs that read “APD is guilty” as they marched for a few blocks to police headquarters. The demonstrators filled the streets, blocking traffic as they went.

“I think the helmet cam has a lot to do with it,” said Hans Erickson, vice chair of the task force. “It’s so important for us to have as much information on these kinds of shootings as we can.”

Erickson said the footage allows the public to see what happened without having to rely solely on accounts of police and witnesses.

The shooting even gained the attention of New Mexico Senate Democrats, who said Albuquerque police officers needed better training.

“It’s shameful that we are not better preparing these officers to handle all situations that come their way,” said Senate Majority Leader Michael Sanchez, D-Belen. “Unfortunately, it is at the expense of precious lives.”

Police said the Boyd shooting is being investigated by five outside agencies. Berry announced Monday he asked Las Cruces police to join the investigation and told Justice Department officials they were free to review any files on Boyd’s death.

“The problem is, yes, we need an independent investigation in this incident. But there have been over 20 other incidents,” said Alan Wagman, a member of the task force and a criminal defense attorney.

The Police Oversight Task Force was created by the Albuquerque City Council to help review the police oversight process. Their list of recommendations, including allowing a commission to give policy recommendations directly to the police chief, is scheduled to go before city councilors, said chair Andrew Lipman.

blog comments powered by Disqus