Museums retrace March on Washington 50 years later

WASHINGTON (AP) — Numerous exhibits and programs in the nation’s capital will allow visitors to retrace the historic steps of the 1963 March on Washington 50 years later.

Students took a prominent role in the civil rights movement in the early 1960s, leading up to the march. Their role is the focus of a new exhibit that has opened at the Newseum, a museum about journalism and the First Amendment.

The exhibit, “Make Some Noise,” features a section of the original Woolworth’s lunch counter from Greensboro, N.C., where four black college students launched a sit-in movement after being denied service because of their race.

The Newseum also is launching a three-year changing exhibit “Civil Rights at 50,” which will be updated each year with key milestones in the civil rights movement.

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