Army says it doesn’t provide hormone treatment to inmates

FORT MEADE, Md. (AP) — An attorney for Bradley Manning tells NBC’s “Today” show that he hopes officials at the military prison at Fort Leavenworth in Kansas will honor Manning’s request for hormone treatment. If not, the lawyer says, he will do everything in his power to make it happen.

Manning says in a statement that he wants to live as a woman named Chelsea, and begin hormone treatment as soon as possible.

But the Army says it doesn’t provide the treatment, or sex-reassignment surgery. A spokesman says inmates are treated as soldiers, and are given access to mental health professionals.

At Leavenworth, a spokesman says there’s never been a case similar to Manning’s, and that the soldier would need to petition for a transfer to a federal prison to receive hormone treatment.

A former Army prosecutor says he doubts the military would voluntarily move Manning to a civilian prison, but that the transfer could be ordered by a judge. And Greg Rinckey says if Manning dressed as a woman, he might have to be segregated from the general population. As for the hormone treatment, he says the military’s view is, “You enlisted as a male, you’re a male, you’re going to be incarcerated as a male.”

Manning’s struggle with gender identity disorder was a key part of his defense at his court-martial, where he was sentenced yesterday to 35 years for providing secret documents to WikiLeaks.

%@AP Links

160-a-06-(Greg Rinckey, managing partner at Tully Rinckey and former Army prosecutor, in AP interview)-”incarcerated as a male”-Former Army prosecutor Greg Rinckey says the Pentagon is quite clear that it does not provide hormone therapy or sex-reassignment surgery for gender identity disorder. (22 Aug 2013)

<<CUT *160 (08/22/13)££ 00:06 “incarcerated as a male”

161-a-09-(Greg Rinckey, managing partner at Tully Rinckey and former Army prosecutor, in AP interview)-”an appellate court”-Former Army prosecutor Greg Rinckey says the military will have to consider whether to move Manning from military to civilian prison. (22 Aug 2013)

<<CUT *161 (08/22/13)££ 00:09 “an appellate court”

162-a-12-(Greg Rinckey, managing partner at Tully Rinckey and former Army prosecutor, in AP interview)-”to be segregated”-Former Army prosecutor Greg Rinckey says if Manning is not transferred out of military prison, there could be some problems. (22 Aug 2013)

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148-a-08-(David Coombs, lawyer for Bradley Manning, in interview)-”to move forward”-Manning’s lawyer David Coombs says his client — referred to here as Chelsea — is now ready to move on to the next stage. ((MANDATORY CREDIT: NBC’s Today program) (22 Aug 2013)

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GRAPHICSBANK: David Coombs, as defense attorney for Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, Hanover, Maryland, graphic element on gray (22 Aug 2013)

APPHOTO NY112: FILE – In this Tuesday, Aug. 20, 2013 file photo, Army Pfc. Bradley Manning is escorted to a security vehicle outside a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., after a hearing in his court martial. Manning plans to live as a woman named Chelsea and wants to begin hormone therapy as soon as possible, the soldier said Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013, a day after he was sentenced to 35 years in prison for sending classified material to WikiLeaks. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File) (20 Aug 2013)

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APPHOTO NY111: FILE – In this undated file photo provided by the U.S. Army, Pfc. Bradley Manning poses for a photo wearing a wig and lipstick. Manning plans to live as a woman named Chelsea and wants to begin hormone therapy as soon as possible, the soldier said Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013, a day after he was sentenced to 35 years in prison for sending classified material to WikiLeaks. (AP Photo/U.S. Army, File) (14 Aug 2013)

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