Support from both parties for decision to cancel summit

WASHINGTON (AP) — Lawmakers from both parties are voicing support for President Barack Obama’s decision to cancel an upcoming Moscow summit with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

The move sent a stern message of disapproval over Russia’s harboring of National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden.

Democratic Sen. Charles Schumer of New York says Putin has been “acting like a school-yard bully.” He says the Russian leader “doesn’t deserve the respect a bilateral summit would have accorded him.”

And Republican congressman Ed Royce of California says the move “should help make clear” that it was “unacceptable” for Russia to give temporary asylum to Snowden.

White House deputy national security adviser Ben Rhodes says it was the “unanimous view” of Obama and his national security team that a summit wouldn’t make sense in the current environment, which Rhodes described as a troubled relationship. He says the Snowden decision served only to worsen tensions, and that the U.S. saw few signs that progress could be made at a summit on other agenda items.

Russia’s government is voicing disappointment, saying the decision shows that the U.S. isn’t able to develop relations with Russia on an “equal basis.” A foreign affairs adviser says Russia remains ready to work together with the U.S. “on all key issues.”

%@AP Links

167-c-19-(Mark Smith, AP White House correspondent)-”all key issues”-AP White House Correspondent Mark Smith reports the reaction in Russia has been low-key to President Obama’s canceling his summit with Vladimir Putin. (7 Aug 2013)

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168-c-16-(Vladimir Isachenkov (ee-sah-CHEHN’-kawf), AP correspondent)-”of mutual interest”-Vladimir Isachenkov reports that Russia’s disappointed that President Obama has canceled a meeting with Vladimir Putin, but that the invitation still stands. (7 Aug 2013)

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159-w-36-(Mark Smith, AP White House correspondent, with President Barack Obama)–Retaliating for Russia’s decision to shelter NSA leaker Edward Snowden, President Obama has scrubbed plans for a summit with Vladimir Putin. AP White House Correspondent Mark Smith reports. (7 Aug 2013)

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APPHOTO MOSB103: Russian President Vladimir Putin listens during a meeting at the Novo-Ogaryovo residence outside Moscow on Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2013. The White House announced Wednesday that President Barack Obama has canceled plans to meet with Putin in Moscow next month. The rare diplomatic snub is retribution for Russia’s decision to grant temporary asylum to National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden. It also reflects growing U.S. frustration with Russia on several other issues, including missile defense and human rights. (AP Photo/RIA Novosti, Alexei Nikolsky, Presidential Press Service) (7 Aug 2013)

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APPHOTO LON105: FILE – This June 17, 2013 file photo shows President Barack Obama meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Enniskillen, Northern Ireland. It was reported Wednesday Aug. 7. 2013, President Barack Obama is canceling plans to meet with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Moscow next month — a rare diplomatic snub.The move is retribution for Russia’s decision to grant temporary asylum to Edward Snowden, who is accused of leaking highly secretive details about National Security Agency surveillance programs. It also reflects growing U.S. frustration with Russia on several issues, including missile defense and human rights. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File) (17 Jun 2013)

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