Okla. twister debris would create mile-high pile

This aerial photo shows damage to Moore Medical Center after it was hit by a massive tornado in Moore, Okla., Monday May 20, 2013. A tornado roared through the Oklahoma City suburbs Monday, flattening entire neighborhoods, setting buildings on fire and landing a direct blow on an elementary school. (AP Photo/Steve Gooch)
This aerial photo shows damage to Moore Medical Center after it was hit by a massive tornado in Moore, Okla., Monday May 20, 2013. A tornado roared through the Oklahoma City suburbs Monday, flattening entire neighborhoods, setting buildings on fire and landing a direct blow on an elementary school. (AP Photo/Steve Gooch)

MOORE, Okla. (AP) – Before Moore can rebuild, the Oklahoma community where a deadly tornado struck must deal with crushed wood, mangled siding and battered belongings. If stacked in a pile, the debris would likely reach more than a mile high.

The splintered remains’ first stop is a landfill where it will be sorted, then recycled or burned. Bricks will go to charity projects such as Habitat for Humanity. Wood, paper and clothing will be incinerated.

Jessie Childs watched from a neighbors’ driveway as a bulldozer reduced her house to a 10-foot pile of rubble. Childs says she could be sad about it, but that wouldn’t make anything come back.

The May 20 storm killed 24 people and carved a 17-mile path of destruction. About 4,000 homes and businesses were destroyed.

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