What the Veep? If bullets were chocolate

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(LIN) — After the tragic shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., it became much harder to avoid conversations about gun violence.

Even a 7-year-old named Myles came up with a suggestion, and he took it straight to the top.

Myles, a second-grader at Downtown Montessori Elementary School in Milwaukee, Wis., went to a reading specialist at his school with his plan. (Myles’ last name has not been released by school officials.)

“He said if we have chocolate bullets, nobody would get hurt and nobody would be sad,” said Barbara Rankin at the school.

So Myles got to work, putting his plan into letters to Vice President Joe Biden, President Barack Obama and Rep. Gwen Moore, R-Wis.

Then Biden did the unexpected, but classic Biden move: He wrote back.

I am sorry it took me so very long to respond to your letter. I really like your idea. If we had guns that shot chocolate, not only would our country be safer, it would be happier. People love chocolate.

You are a good boy, Joe Biden.

When you’re a kid and you write a letter to the White House (or anyone famous), it’s your biggest hope that it will actually get read. At the very least, you might get a form-letter response.

Myles got a handwritten letter on White House stationary, and school officials say he wanted everyone to see it. He made copies of the letter and passed it around to friends and family, telling other kids, “Did you know I was going to be famous?”

What the Veep is a bi-weekly feature about the office of the vice president. Jessica O. Swink is a contributing editor toonPolitix . Join in the conversation on Facebook and Twitter .

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